Tag Archives: Hawaii

Love it when some things never change

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On Saturday my pal, Bruce, celebrated his 60th birthday.

Yes, I used “friend” and “60″ in a sentence.

See, for more than a decade, I’ve been friends with this group of early-morning surfers I affectionately called the “Old Guys.” And Bruce is one of the youngest in the group.

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That’s Bruce, in the red shirt.

It all started years ago, way back when I was a reporter with the now-defunct Honolulu Advertiser. I would paddle out in Waikīkī at first light to catch a few waves before heading to work. There were a bunch of us doing the same thing — an elementary school counselor, a Wrigley’s sales guy, a restaurant owner, a retired mechanic, a landscaper. Like it happens at every surf break, I’m sure around the world, we all started talking. First, about boards, maybe. Then, about jobs. And finally, we were all on a first-name basis.

We started meeting for coffee in front of McDonald’s on Kalākaua Avenue, then breakfast at Rainbow Drive-In. We trained for triathlons, we organized lunches and dinners, we even went on trips to Vegas and Japan.

For more than 10 years, this was my family.

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As it happens with every group of friends, things change. Some stopped surfing or moved away. Others slowed down or found other things to do. Some left the group, new people joined. It’s different.

I remember vividly a moment when I was sitting at Rainbow’s years ago, listening to everyone chatting and laughing, as we normally do, and thinking, “Right now, everything is perfect.” But in the back of my mind, I knew that things would inevitably change.

And it did.

I don’t paddle out as often anymore, opting to surf with my husband in the afternoons instead. And now that I’m freelancing full time, I find it easier to work in the early morning instead of surf, anyway, so it all works out. But I do miss the Old Guys, the banter and the laughter, but life has moved in a different direction for me. And it’s all good.

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It was nice to see everyone on Saturday, catching up with friends I don’t see as often anymore. I can’t say I wasn’t a little sad to see how much things had changed — and how much I’ve missed! — but it was nice to know a lot hadn’t. They still meet at Rainbow’s, they still tease and bullshit each other, and the laughter hasn’t stopped.

I’ve always believed that life has to move forward and that we have to keep plowing ahead, no matter what. There’s no sense in stopping or going back or wishing things were different. Things are always going to be different, and the only you can do is accept it and keep moving.

But it’s nice to look back sometimes and smile.

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#FUUD: New menu items at Arancino Kahala

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Confession: the last time I dined at Arancino at The Kahala was when it first opened.

A year ago.

So when I was invited to taste the first anniversary menu, I was a bit embarrassed.

I did love dinner there last year. But at the time, it was a prix fix menu that took a full three hours to partake. I wanted to go back — but I just didn’t have the time!

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Since then, though the restaurant, situated at the posh Kahala Hotel & Resort, has begun offering its menu items a la carte for dinner. (You can even order brick-oven pizzas baked on site.) So you can pick and choose what you want.

And now you can pick and choose from even more dishes.

To celebrate its one-year anniversary, Arancino, which has been serving authentic Italian food in Waikīkī for nearly 20 years, is serving up some brand-new menu items in Kāhala, including casarecce ragu di polpo (octopus and casarecce pasta with spicy garlic tomato sauce), tagliatelle con orechiette di mare (Kona abalone with fresh house-made tagliatelle pasta tossed in an abalone bouillon garlic cream sauce) and spaghetti alla carbonara (a deconstructed version of the classic Italian dish with a poached egg, crispy pancetta and truffle butter).

I was most excited about bistecca alla lavanda, a 5-ounce lavender-infused sous vide A5 Miyazaki premium wagyu beef, served with roasted petite potatoes and onions petals. Miyazaki is a region in Kyushu in Japan that grows high-quality cattle. And I had heard that this particular cut and preparation was mind-blowing.

I like having my mind blown.

So here’s a glimpse into the new menu at Arancino:

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Here’s how I like to start my meals: with a drink. This is called the Arancino ($11), one of the restaurant’s signature cocktails made with Skyy blood orange vodka, Combier Liqueur D’Orange, passionfruit puree and sweet-and-sour.

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This is one of my all-time favorite amuse bouche (though it’s not a traditional single bite): Kahuku corn foam with prosciutto. Great texture and flavors.

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Arancino knows how to serve up a memorable bread plate. Here, rosemary foccacia, a whole wheat square and — my favorite — a parmesan crostini. It was all served with softened butter and Hawaiian sea salt.

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One of the restaurant’s popular dishes, if not just for its stunning presentation, the crostacei di mare ($19) features Kona abalone, Moloka‘i ama ebi and scallops with micro greens and topped with herb oil. It’s arranged by Chef Daisuke Hamamoto to resemble a coral reef.

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Our server recommended the fegato d’oca ($19), sautéed foie gras with a wild raspberry red wine reduction. It was a nice piece of decadent goose liver, seared and topped with the slightly-sweet-but-savory reduction. The small bread squares were great to sop up the sauce at the end.

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One of the menu’s highlights — and a new dish — is the spaghetti alla carbonara ($25), chef’s take on the classic Italian dish. This one, though, features a poached egg, tons of cheese, cream, pancetta and truffle butter. Thanks to the cream, cheese and poached egg, this dish was rich and creamy and delicious.

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I’m surprised to even write this, but this risotto primavera ($23) was one of my favorites of the night. The perfectly prepared risotto was paired with 14 different seasonal vegetables and topped with parmigiano reggiano cheese. Light but filling and incredibly tasty. The crispy kale chip on the side was a nice bonus.

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Another new menu item is the grigliata di mare ($38), a plate of grilled lobster, scallops, shrimp, calamari and the fresh catch of the day, with watercress pesto and a spicy tomato sauce.

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But the star of the dinner was the 5-ounce Miyazaki beef. The bistecca alla lavanda ($70) was infused with lavender and served sous vide style. This beef, rare to find in Hawai‘i, has been the winner of the Prime Minister’s Award in Japan for the past 10 years for its outstanding quality. And it’s obvious why. You literally didn’t have to chew, the marbled meat was so soft and tender. It came with salt, pepper and a house-made mustard, along with a super unique shoyu gelee (that I gobbled up). Trust me, though, the meat could stand alone.

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While I really wanted the torta al cioccolato (a dark chocolate torte with a kumquat compote) or the panna cotta made with a house-made Hamakua tomato sorbet, I let my husband pick dessert. He chose the Monte Bianco ($10), a nugget of custard-filled chestnut puree with chestnut meringue triangles and a yuzu honey sauce. I was surprised I could eat any more, after that meal! But then again, there’s always room for dessert!

Arancino’s current five-course tasting menu is priced at $85 ($110 with wine pairings by Japanese world champion grand master sommelier Shinya Tasaki) and provides great value, with some of the restaurant’s newest and most popular dishes available to order. And there’s often live music, too.

Arancino at The Kahala, The Kahala Hotel & Resort, 5000 Kahala Ave. Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. for lunch, 5 to 10:30 p.m. for dinner daily. Phone: 808-380-4400.

To learn more about Arancino at The Kahala, follow @arancinokahala on Instagram or like the restaurant on Facebook.

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#LovingNow: Nene Goose Bakery in Kailua

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The other day I had to pick up my dogs at Nalowinds Boarding Kennels in Waimānalo.

It was early in the morning — well before 7 a.m. — and I needed to pick up something to give the Duartes, who had watched my dogs that weekend.

I was already on the Pali Highway, halfway to Waimānalo, and I couldn’t think of a quick place to grab something small, like a box of donuts or a custard pie.

I went down my mental list of bakeries on O‘ahu’s windward side: Deluxe Pastry Shop with its cream-filled long johns, Kaneohe Bakery next door with its custard pie, Agnes’ Portuguese Bake Shop in Kailua with its to-die-for malasadas.

All of which were too far. I was in a hurry.

So I Googled bakeries nearby and up popped Nene Goose Bakery in the Keolu Shopping Center. It was practically on the way!

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It’s a very unassuming, Japanese-style bakery, tucked away in a very quiet shopping center that boasts a movie theater and an okazuya, among other things. You can barely see the sign, though the bright interior lights and glass cases filled with colorful pastries will definitely draw you in.

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The bakery, started by the Nagai family in 1995, churns out all sorts of delights, from glazed donuts to cinnamon rolls to savory pastries. The specialties here, though, are breads, particularly the French and spinach loaves, not to mention small breads in the shapes of animals.

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I’ve been here before, in the early afternoon, and it’s almost a faux pax to ask for spinach bread, as the bakery’s signature loaves sell out very quickly. You have to go early in the morning to grab a half loaf. (The bakery makes raisin, walnut and whole wheat breads, too.)

The spinach bread doesn’t taste like spinach at all. It has a soft texture, typical of Japanese-style breads, and a clean flavor. It’s not laden with preservatives or overly sweet. It’s a perfect loaf, to be honest, even with the speckle of green.

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Another signature item here is the mochi anpan, a Japanese bread pastry filled with sweetened red bean paste and a small, round ball of mochi. It’s expensive, but the size of the anpan — about a big as a baseball — and the uniqueness of this pastry make the price tag worthwhile. The bakery makes about 100 pieces a day.

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I love that this is a true, old-fashioned neighborhood bakery — there aren’t many left on O‘ahu! — that serves high-quality baked goods, including breads, butter rolls, donuts, even pies (on Saturday only).

My favorites are the mochi anpan (of course), the spinach bread (duh), the glazed donuts (best on the island, for sure), the old-fashioned cake donut (loaded with white sugar), the cinnamon rolls (made with a butter flake roll), and the buttermilk donut (perfection).

Of course, I haven’t tried everything on the menu, so that list isn’t definitive. But it’s a start!

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Nene Goose Bakery, 1090 Keolu Dr. #111 in Enchanted Lake, Hours: 6 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays, Thursdays through Sundays, closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays and during lunch from noon to 1 p.m. Phone: 808-262-1080.

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#Done: Pop-up brunch with Anthony Yang

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In case you missed it — and you really shouldn’t have — Anthony Yang was in town this weekend and hosted one of his cult-popular pop-up brunches in Mānoa.

Just about every food-obsessed person I know — including Honolulu Magazine food editor Martha Cheng, Frolic‘s foodies Melissa Chang and Grant Shindo, Henry Adaniya of Hank’s Haute Dogs, Hawaii Luxury Magazine‘s Sarah Honda, Good To Grill‘s Jason Kim, Roy’s Restaurant‘s Robbyn Shim — was there, ready to sample some of Yang’s creative brunch dishes.

Yang, who sharpened his culinary knives at Per Se and Michael Mina, started hosting pop-up brunch events — called Ante Meridian — for his coworkers and friends more than a year ago. Since then, they’ve become so popular, they take place twice a month and often sells out within hours of releasing the menu. (He’s even started a dinner pop-up called, of course, “Post Meridian.”) (Read more about him here.)

Yes, it was a bit pricey — almost $50 per ticket — but it would certainly cost most to fly to San Francisco to attend one of his events there.

Here are some snapshots from the morning:

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The kitchen was bustling with local chefs — including chefs Chris Kajioka and Mark Noguchi — working with Yang on how to prepare and plate each dish.

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The first of four courses of this prix fixe menu was this plate with dollops of yogurt from Naked Cow Dairy Farm and Creamery, coffee granola and lilikoi. Really tasty and not overly sweet.

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The second dish was a brioche bread pudding — using bread crafted by Christopher Sy, who was also there — with corn, macadamia nut and squash compliments. I was slightly obsessed with the corn puree.

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Next was the rice porridge with togarashi pork, homemade pickles and a poached egg. I loved the pickled cucumbers, radishes and kim chee cabbage. The pork, too, was a great balance of salty and smoky. This was my favorite dish, hands down.

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Another highlight was the famed black truffle waffles, perfectly crispy and light with a hint of black truffle.

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Yang thanked the sold-out crowd in attendance and gave everyone donut holes to take home. I gotta say, it was well worth the money — and missing a south swell, too.

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Congratulations to Amanda Corby and Pili Hawai‘i for another great event!

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5Qs with SF’s Anthony Yang

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Brunch and pop-ups.

Talk about the two culinary buzz words of this century.

Add “San Francisco-based chef” to the entire phrase and you’ve got the morning event of the year, happening this weekend.

San Francisco-based chef Anthony Yang, formerly of Per Se and Michael Mina, will headline “Ante Meridian” on Oahu this weekend, presenting a four-course prixe fixe brunch menu highlighting a mix of seasonal local ingredients and San Francisco flair.

Here’s a peek at the menu: Kona coffee-flavored granola on local organic yogurt with taro-date jam, macadamia nut brioche bread pudding with brown butter roasted pineapple and vanilla creme fraiche, and black truffle waffles.

Yes, I said black truffle waffles.

Yang started hosting pop-up brunch events for his coworkers and friends more than a year ago. Since then, they’ve become so popular, they take place twice a month and often sells out within hours of releasing the menu. (He’s even started a dinner pop-up called, of course, “Post Meridian.”)

I got a chance to chat with Yang to find out more about this weekend’s events — which are, by the way, not sold out. Yet.

1. So you’ve worked for a couple of big names — and now you’re doing these pop-ups. What’s the appeal?

The appeal is my approach to brunch. Brunch is never really the focus for a restaurant, especially ones that are open for dinner. If it is the main focus of a restaurant, I feel like most people are doing the same things. Pancakes that are too sweet, Belgian waffles that are dense and chewy, twelve different types of omelettes etc. I try to refine my take on brunch a little more. Also, for the pop-ups, the fact that you buy a ticket before hand has a lot of appeal to people. After you buy the ticket online, you don’t have to wait in line like every other person waiting for a table for brunch on a weekend. The convenience of just showing up, not having to bring cash and split the bill with your group of friends, and letting us do all the work is what appeals to most people, I would say. And the Black Truffle Waffles!

2. Are you surprised with how popular your pop-up events have gotten?

It’s taken a lot of time and work to build this “brand” that people are beginning to familiarize themselves with. There were some really slow days at first like any business, but I’ve tried to create something that is a little different and approachable to everybody. So not really.

3. Why did you want to become a chef? Who inspired you along the way?

Working in the industry runs in the family, I guess. My parents worked in Chinese restaurants all my life as a kid and eventually bought a small, fast food Chinese place that I worked in growing up. After high school I applied to culinary school at the local community college and went from there. Ive been inspired by so many people along the way. David Breeden, the chef de cuisine of The French Laundry is a huge inspiration. Chris Kajioka from Vintage Cave really inspired me to just go for it. Ron Siegel showed me that you can be a great chef and a nice guy at the same time.

4. How did you come to do a pop-up in Hawaii and what are you most excited about?

Chris Kajioka, Mark Noguchi and Hank Adaniya came to San Francisco a few months back to do a pop-up to represent Hawaii and I helped them with the event. I started thinking how cool it would be to do my pop-up in Hawaii. The goal was to just make enough money to cover my trip. Thanks to Chris, Mark, Hank, and Amanda from UMU, we made it happen after a few brain storming sessions. I’m most excited about eating at all the great restaurants that I keep hearing about and hanging out with good friends.

5.What are you planning to do — and where you planning to eat — while you’re in town?

Nick Erker, who is coming with me to help cook used to live and work on Oahu at Chef Mavro and with Andrew (Le) at The Pig and the Lady. And I’m leaving the planning up to him. He says were going straight to Ethel’s Grill from the airport for lunch. I’ve heard only great things about The Pig and the Lady and I know Andrew from culinary school. I hear Chris Kajioka is doing a pop-up and hopefully we’ll be able to go to that. Eastern Paradise is like my kind of soul food, so were definitely going to get some dumplings and jia jiang mien.

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ANTE MERIDIAN 808 BRUNCH POP-UP
When: Saturday, July 12 (10 a.m. and 1 p.m.) and Sunday, July 13 (10 a.m.)
Where: 2970 E. Manoa Road Honolulu, HI 96822
Cost: $45/person, tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.

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